3 Pillars of Successful Restaurant Staffing

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Recruiting is as much a marketing practice as strategies you use to bring in customers. Just as you promote your brand and emphasize the delights of dining at your establishment, you need to delight candidates in order for them to become a part of your team.

You are utilizing latest technology to engage your patrons before, during, and after their dining experience. You are utilizing mobile technology because you have recognized that it is the device of choice for a significant majority of them. You’ve invested in managing your brand and you use every resource to engage your patrons.

Studies have also shown that many brands’ patrons actually make the best employees.

Well, let’s consider a few thoughts:

  • Are your recruiting efforts keeping up with today’s best practices – including mobile?
  • Are you still using reactive ad postings, praying to get applicants?
  • Are you measuring the effectiveness of your job postings by monitoring the click-to-apply ratio? Is it in low single digits?
  • Are you using the complex HRIS systems designed for the corporate world, which usually require dedicated recruiting staff?
  • Is your recruitment compliance process heavy, putting applicants through a long arduous process just to submit an application?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, it might be time to reconsider your recruitment strategies.

Staffing your restaurants with qualified staff relies on three major pillars. Weakness in any one adversely impacts your recruitment success.

Job Description

The job description is often the first impression most job seekers get about working at your establishment. Even if they are familiar with your brand, the job description is the first communication, which tells them what it’s like to work at your place.

We recommend taking this first impression opportunity to tell the candidate why it is great to be a part of your organization. Share with them how rewarding it can be, the flexible hours, opportunity to grow, learning about the wonderful culinary world, etc.

I have seen many job descriptions and many feel like what I call “a prison sentence” – several pages long, riddled with all of the harsh conditions of working at a restaurant. It is perfectly fine to have a job description with duties, which discloses the working conditions and the expectation as a part of the hiring process, but not the recruitment.

The job description should cover more of why a person should be a part of your team and how they can grow within your organization.

Get them excited to apply for your jobs.

Job Distribution

Job seekers have varying habits when it comes to searching for a job. They go to various job boards, Google, your own website, employer review sites, etc. to learn about your business and apply for your jobs. A study recently found that jobseekers often visit as many as 15 sites before they apply to a job.

Let’s not forget the location itself. A restaurant’s location is often the best marketing tool, invoking the following thought in the mind of the best passive applicant “… how wonderful it would be to work at this place.” Can a job seeker apply for a job at your location with their mobile device, with just a few clicks?

Is your recruitment marketing consistent across all these channels?

A comprehensive and optimized job distribution network is of the essence in getting your jobs in front of the right applicants. Your job descriptions need to be exciting, ever-present, optimized for search engines, and distributed to as many job boards as possible for the most exposure.

Applicant Engagement

Applicant engagement is the third pillar of successful staffing. It is critical for every organization to fully understand their entire application process. Consider the mindset of a job seeker looking for a near minimum wage job. Consider the fact that we are in a very competitive and tight labor market. Would you expect someone seeking a line cook position or a wait staff position to take 45 minutes to complete an application?

Ease of applicant engagement is directly correlated to the click-to-apply ratio. A recent study by ERE Media demonstrated that if the application process is less than 5 minutes, a click-to-apply ratio of 12.8% can be expected. However, if the application process exceeds 15 minutes, then the click-to-apply ratio drops below 4%. This is a significant decrease; couple that with the fact that it is generally the best applicants who abandon long application processes (because they have options) and you can see why this is important to you. 

Going through the entire application process from the viewpoint of an applicant enables you to observe the bottlenecks and points of friction. Consider the fact that every decision or click is an opportunity for the job seeker to abandon the application process altogether. 

Conclusion

Many organizations react to their recruitment when in crisis.  Implementing a comprehensive recruitment strategy enables you to have a very proactive recruiting process. A system covering the 3 Pillars with 24/7/365 recruitment provides a constant flow of great candidates, which provides options to truly elevate the quality of your team.

The idea of three pillars implies that the three practices must be employed for the success in staffing. It is essential to address all three simultaneously to achieve the best results. We consider each one the pillars a major topic and worthy of its own comprehensive coverage.

Please look for our upcoming blogs covering each one in more depth.

Celebrity First Hourly Jobs

Did you know some of today’s most popular celebrities started their careers on the same path that you are going down — through the hourly workforce? In fact, studies have shown that one in every eight American workers has been employed by McDonald’s. Believe it or not, your not so glamorous restaurant job can be your most defining, and set you on the path to bigger and better things.

A new year is on the horizon – can you believe we are just 6 weeks away from 2016? In the next few weeks as we approach the new year, we are going to provide advice to help set you up on a successful career path. Today’s Blog will take a look at celebrity first hourly jobs, to help show that your first job can be the most crucial of your career path. So whether it’s a quick-service restaurant or retail store at the mall, every person has to start somewhere in their career. Here are a few big names you won’t believe started the same way you are!

Harry Styles: Bakery Assistant
Before hitting it big with One Direction, Harry Styles worked at a bakery.

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Get started in your career like Harry Styles — we have Bakery jobs on our Job Board!

Carly Rae Jepsen: Barista 
Before her viral music hit, Call Me Maybe, Carly Rae Jepsen worked as a Barista to pay for rent while she pursued her musical career.

Carly Rae

Check out our Barista jobs on on Job Board!

Rachel McAdams: Worked at McDonald’s
Before The Notebook and Dear John, Rachel McAdams worked at McDonald’s. She describes McDonald’s as “a great place to work.”

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Check our Job Board for open jobs at McDonald’s near you!

Crystal Reed: Ice Cream Scooper
Before her days starring in Teen Wolf, Crystal Reed scooped ice cream.

Crystal Reed

Check out our jobs at CREAM Nation, Tin Pot Creamery, and other sweet shops here.

Beyoncé: Hair Styling Assistant
Before she ruled the world, Beyoncé swept hair off the floor of her mother’s hair salon.

Beyonce

Who wouldn’t want to follow in Beyonce’s footsteps? We have Hair Stylist jobs near you on our Job Board!

Madonna: Jelly-Filler for Dunkin’ Donuts
Before she was the Material Girl of the 80’s, Madonna worked a minimum wage job at Dunkin’  Donuts.

Madonna

To get started in your career like Madonna, check out our jobs at Dunkin’ Donuts and Krispy Kreme here.

Jim Carey & Jon Bon Jovi: Worked as Janitors
Before Jim Carey started working as a stand-up comedian and Jon Bon Jovi was livin’ on a prayer, they used to work as Janitors to support themselves and their families.

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We have  Janitorial or Custodian job opportunities on our Job Board!

QR-Scanning App Helps Restaurant Owners Find Employees

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[Originally posted to pizzamarketplace.com]

ZippyApp announced its new online marketplace for employers and hourly workers that’s leveraging mobile technology and social media to help employers recruit and hire well-qualified employees. Kamyar Faron, a Millennial hiring expert and ZippyApp CEO, created the app to make it as easy as possible for restaurants to hire more efficiently and job seekers to land jobs more quickly using their smartphones, according to a company announcement.

Rather than filling out multiple employment applications all asking for identical information, ZippyApp enables job seekers to complete one common job application online and submit it via smartphone, tablet or computer to apply to any restaurant in ZippyApp’s employer network. Job seekers learn about job openings from ZippyApp’s employer marketplace, and Facebook and Twitter feeds, and wherever they see ZippyApp’s window decal at an employer’s restaurant, they can scan the decal’s QR code with their smartphone and instantly apply for a job.

Restaurants using ZippyApp’s mobile tech tools can more easily recruit qualified, local job applicants, and more efficiently manage the interview and hiring process, the announcement stated, and Counter Burger, Panera Bread, Krispy Kreme, Jamba Juice and McDonald’s are among ZippyApp’s early adopters.

The 6 Success Factors for a New Job

Success at Job

Congratulations on getting the job! Although you have passed through enough hurdles already – from having an eye-catching application to mastering pre-interview and interview etiquette –landing the job doesn’t mean your efforts should stop. In fact, the first few months at a new job are oftentimes a trial period to ensure the company has hired the right person. Even though everyone’s workplace is different, we all face the same challenges when we start a new job. Become a rockstar in your new position with these success tips!

  • Accept the “Newbie” status (and the grunt work that comes along with it). Chances are when you start a new job you’ll be asked to do some grunt work before you have any real responsibility. Showing good work ethic no matter what the task is you are assigned to do is what will set you apart from others. This means no complaining or disagreeing.
  • Ask questions. Managers like when you ask questions as it shows you are taking your new role seriously. Your manager wants to see you do your job correctly (they did hire you after all!), and the best way to make sure that happens is to ask questions. Be sure to actively listen and restate what your manager answers back to avoid miscommunication.
  • Take initiative. Asking questions when you need to and wanting to learn are great qualities to posses, but so is taking initiative. If you see an area that is lacking or something that needs to be done – like napkins that need to be folded or silverware that needs to be put away –doing it rather than asking permission will show you take initiative, which is another excellent quality to have.
  • Go above and beyond. Have you heard the term, “The more you put in, the more you get out?” Well this is especially true of any job you hold. Oftentimes, it’s not the person who does only their job that gets promoted – it’s the person who goes above and beyond what their role is. This means that even if a certain task is not in your job description, you do it — especially if your manager asks.
  • Keep organized and never miss a deadline. Being on time, getting your work done, and keeping yourself organized are important factors when starting a new job. Don’t come in late and make sure you always complete your tasks before you leave for the day.
  • Break time and time off etiquette. Although companies are required to give their employees breaks and lunches, asking when your next break will be does not leave a good impression. Your employer will believe you just see the job as a paycheck – not one that you enjoy doing. The same goes for time-off requests. If you already have a vacation planned before you accept your new position, be sure to let your new manager know as soon as possible (when you accept the position is the best time). Otherwise, wait until your 90-day trial period is over until you start asking for time off.

Do you have any success tips or advice to share? We’d love to hear from you! Post your comment below.